Bartlett's Buildings
   1) On the south side of Holborn Circus at Nos. 4, 5, and 6 (P.O. Directory.) In Farringdon Ward Without.
   First mention: Hatton, 1708.
   In O. and M. 1677 "Bartlet's Court." Occupies the site of both Bartlett's Buildings and Bartlett's Court of the later maps, and it is mentioned by this name in the parish registers as early as 1615. The buildings seem to have been rebuilt after the formation of Holborn Circus, when some of the houses were removed. Described by Hatton, 1708, as a pleasant square court, near against Hatton Street.
   Thomas Bartlett, King's printer, 2 Ed. VI., possessed "the Plow" in Fetter Lane, and the buildings and Court were named after him or his descendants, who still held the property.
   He also had a tenement and garden in Crokehorne Alley (q.v.) in 2 and 3 P. and M., which Alley adjoined Thavies Inn on the east, and therefore must have occupied the site or some part of the site of the present Bartlett's Buildings.
   There is a stone tablet on No.28 with the date 1685, which is not the date of erection, but possibly indicated the date of a rebuilding (perhaps of Bartlett Street, q.v.). This tablet was originally on No. I, on the north-west side of the street at its junction with Holborn, but when that house was pulled down in 1866 the stone was given to the then owner of No.28 (H. Co. Mag. No.23, p. 244).
   2) On the west side of Nightingale Lane in East Smithfield (Elmes, 1831), the first turning from Upper East Smithfield.
   Site now occupied by warehouses, etc., belonging to the Docks.

A Dictionary of London. . 1918.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bartlett's Passage —    West out of Bartlett s Buildings at No.9 to Fetter Lane (P.O. Directory).    First mention: Rocque, 1746.    Seems to be called Dermers Passage in Lockie, 1810.    Named after Bartlett s Buildings or Court …   Dictionary of London

  • Bartlett Court —    South out of Holborn between Bartlett s Buildings and Thavies Inn (Strype, 1720 Elmes, 1831).    In O. and M., 1677, it occupies the site also of Bartlett s Buildings.    First mention: 1615. Parish register of St. Andrew s Holborn.    Site… …   Dictionary of London

  • Bartlett Street —    A new street so called, forming part of Bartlett s Buildings, 1686 (L.C.C. Deeds, Harben bequest, 1600 1700, No.94).    Site now occupied by Bartlett s Buildings …   Dictionary of London

  • The Bartlett — is the Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. University College London created the first chair of architecture in 1841, and the school is named after the original benefactor, Sir Herbert Bartlett.The BartlettThe Bartlett… …   Wikipedia

  • William Henry Bartlett — Infobox Artist bgcolour = name = William Henry Bartlett imagesize = 200px caption = Self portrait of W H Bartlett, from the cover of his book Working A Canoe Up A Rapid . birthname = birthdate = March 26 1809 location = deathdate = September 13… …   Wikipedia

  • Herbert Henry Bartlett — Sir Herbert Henry Bartlett, 1st Baronet (30 April 1842 ndash; 23 June 1921) was a civil engineer and contractor responsible for many landmark buildings in London. Born at Hardington Mandeville, he was chairman and managing director of Perry Co,… …   Wikipedia

  • Bob Bartlett — Infobox Senator name=Bob Bartlett jr/sr=United States Senator state=Alaska term= January 3, 1959 ndash; December 11, 1968 preceded= Statehood (one of the first two senators) succeeded= Ted Stevens date of birth= April 20, 1904 place of birth=… …   Wikipedia

  • St Michael's Church, Ditton — St Michael s Church, Ditton, from the northwest …   Wikipedia

  • St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador — Not to be confused with Saint John, New Brunswick. St. John s   City   …   Wikipedia

  • Thomas Bartlett, Jr. — Thomas Bartlett, Jr. (June 18, 1808 September 12, 1876) was a U.S. Representative from Vermont.Born in Sutton, Vermont, Bartlett attended the common schools.He studied law.He was admitted to the bar in 1833 and commenced practice in Groton,… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”