Bretask Lane
   In Dowgate Ward, leading down to the Thames.
   Some time prior to 1343 this lane had been closed up by Thomas de Porkeslee, who owned the house in the lane, called "la Bretaske," and the wharf adjoining it. For in 1343 an inquest was held by the Mayor and Aldermen and men of Dowgate Ward as to this obstruction, and the lane was declared "communis omnibus hominibus."
   In 3 H. VIII. the Dyers' Company claimed this lane, but the claim was disallowed, and the lane was found to be a common lane of the City and not the Company's (Strype, ed. 1720, I. ii. 207).
   Name derived from the house "La Bretask," standing in the lane (q.v.).
   The mention of the Dyers' Company suggests that the lane may be identified with Dyers' Hall Wharf at No. 95 Upper Thames Street, running south to the Thames, in which street the Dyers' Hall had stood before the Fire of 1666.

A Dictionary of London. . 1918.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Le Bretask, Dowgate —    There was a house of this name in the parish of All Hallows the Less in Dowgate Ward mentioned in the Husting Rolls 62 (102) and 76 (262) (Cal. L. Bk. F. p. 1 note).    In 1334 Nicholas de Farndon gave it under the name le Bretasse in Thames… …   Dictionary of London

  • Le Bretask, Tower —    There seem to have been at least two houses bearing this name in the City in the 14th century.    One near the Tower and the other at Dowgate.    The one near the Tower seems to have been erected at the expense of the City about the year 1339 …   Dictionary of London

  • Le Bretasse —    See La Bretask (Bretask Lane) …   Dictionary of London

  • Dyers' Hall Wharf —    South out of Upper Thames Street at No. 95, between George Alley east and Angel passage west (P.O. Directory). In Dowgate Ward.    First mention: Lockie, 1810.    Former name : Dyers Hall (Horwood, 1799), with the wharf at the south end.… …   Dictionary of London

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